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Summary

In this episode, we’re going to talk to you about your cooling system and coolant additives. You’ll find out how these work, and how to make the best use of them. Remember, heat is an engine’s worst enemy, and it’s people’s enemy, too. And I’ve seen some crazy ways people have tried to cool themselves down.

Note: Improvements in performance depend on the vehicle, it’s condition and how it’s used. This video is not intended to imply that all users will experience the same performance gain by upgrading to Royal Purple.

Transcript

Announcer: In today's episode, the Professor talks about icing your engine.

Sandy: In this episode, we're going to talk to you about your cooling system and coolant additives. You'll find out how these work, and how to make the best use of them. Remember, heat is an engine's worst enemy, and it's people's enemy, too. And I've seen some crazy ways people have tried to cool themselves down.

Who do you know that gives a [honk] about their cooling system until it breaks down and costs them money? How about trying something a bit more down to earth to keep your engine cool, like a cooling system additive? Many coolant additive products only offer limited protection against corrosion, and they don't often contain the proper lubrication to protect your water pump. Most offer some reduction in temperature, but we must consider all the elements. Reducing surface tension is a big element. Let's jump in with a garage experiment.

What is surface tension? Well, a good example can be seen with the common pond skater. Surface tension is a property where the surface of a liquid resists force. Let's take a look at how the surface tension of water can hold up this paper clip. Water won't go around the clip, much like it won't easily flow into all the tiny spots in your engine. For water to efficiently cool your engine, it must be in a liquid state around these internal surfaces.

Due to the heat, poor flow, or air pockets in your water jacket, you often get bubbling and steam, as shown here. As soon as these tiny bubbles start to form due to heat or internal air pockets, your cooling system is compromised. This can cause detonation and other potential combustion issues due to dreaded hot spots and increased operating temperatures. What a cooling system additive does is reduce the surface tension of water, which makes it flow more completely over the surfaces. This allows more water to metal contact. Hot spots are reduced, and heat transfer is increased. The entire system becomes more efficient.

I used this in my race car, as this was a frequent site in the summer heat. Even though your car works and stays at recommended operating temperatures, a cooling system additive can still be advantageous to reduce hot spots and other combustion issues. By the way, Purple Ice is the only product that uses next gen additive technology to keep your cooling system at peak performance. But remember, if your car is still operating at recommended temperatures, it's because the thermostat's at play, so you may not see any changes in operating temperatures. But be assured, it's still helping.

And here's how you can mix Purple Ice in your cooling system. Mixing it with a 50/50 antifreeze mix will give measurable results. But, to see the maximum reduction of temperature, water mixed with Purple Ice is your best bet. In freezing climates, it's recommended to have antifreeze in your cooling system at all times. Whether it's on the road, the track, or towing a vehicle, Purple Ice can be a cost effective solution to your cooling system. Always make sure to have a clean and well maintained cooling system. Many issues arise simply from the lack of maintenance. Cooling additives can't fix a broken system, but it can sure help prevent one.

If you have any questions about your cooling system additives, it's always a good idea to check with the manufacturer for limitations or specialized use. That's our introduction to coolant additives. Thanks for joining us and be sure to catch us again in the garage, with the Garage Professor.

Announcer: And for more information go to GarageProfessor.com.